Online Teaching & Blogging

January 11, 2010

In addition to teaching Albany Law School’s first online course, Patty Salkin will be blogging about her experience.

lst Post: Getting Ready for On-Line Teaching

2nd Post: Organizing Technology to Teach On-Line

3rd Post:  Setting Goals and Evaluation for an On-Line Course

4th Post:   Course Design – Technology Meets Substance in On-Line Curriculum Development

5th Post:  On-Line Discussion Boards Create a New Arena for Engaged Learning Environments

6th Post:  Integrating Internet-Based and Teleconferencing Resources into On-Line Teaching

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Click HERE to read an article by Prof. Salkin about this course from the Spring 2010 Professional Responsibility Newsletter.


Meme-alicious Law Teaching

May 22, 2015

Originally posted on S|M| i |L|E:

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 2.03.12 pmWhile many frequent visitors to social media sites will be aware of (elaborate air quotes) memes, I suspect that their value as a teaching tool has not been recognised. This changed for me late in 2014, thanks to a student of mine whose use of memes in a journal assessment task illustrated very clearly the process of her learning. Let me elaborate.

Meet Paige Webb (metaphorically speaking) now a third year law student. I taught Paige last year in Land Law (1 and 2). I was teaching in block mode – each subject consisted of a six-week block – and to keep students on track, I set a 20% preparation and participation assessment. Students would be graded based on weekly contribution in class, but also on a weekly learning journal. In the journal students would identify how they went about their learning in that week, issues they had and…

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Four Tips for How to Flip a Classroom, Prof Emmy Reeves

March 23, 2015

Four Tips for How to Flip a Classroom, Prof Emmy Reeves.


Live from LegalED’s Igniting Law Teaching Conference — Assessment

March 23, 2015

Live from LegalED’s Igniting Law Teaching Conference — Assessment.


Check Out This Blog

January 30, 2015
smile

taken from socialmediainlegaleducation.com

I just discovered this blog through a pingback to my blog:

pingback

S|M| i |L|E  (http://socialmediainlegaleducation.com) has been around since last summer.

According to their blog:

S|M| i |L|E (Social Media in Legal Education) is a new collaborative project involving Australian legal academics. The project emerged out of discussions between four academics attending the Australasian Law Teachers Association annual conference at Bond University (Gold Coast, Queensland) during July 2014.

The blog offers a wealth of information.

Under the “Libraries” tab, you will find useful articles categorized under: For Academics, In the Media, For Students, For Practioners, Social Media and Legal Issues.

So far, there have been posts about Flipping the Classroom, Twitter, Open Access, Online Discussions, LinkedIn, Tumbler, Pontoon, Storify, Pinterest as used in legal education.

If you interested in using social media in law school teaching, you should add this one to your Blog reader.

 

 


Ravel and Casetext – A New Generation of Legal Research Tools

January 29, 2015

Katrina June Lee , Susan Azyndar , and Ingrid Mattson have published A New Era: Integrating Today’s ‘Next Gen’ Research Tools Ravel and Casetext in the Law School Classroom, forthcoming in Rutgers University Computer & Technology Law Journal .

Here’s the abstract:

The legal research landscape is changing…again. In recent years, law school professors introduced Google, WestlawNext, and LexisAdvance into their classrooms. Now, a new generation of legal research tools that include the innovative Ravel and Casetext will have law school professors grappling with the questions: Should law professors teach these next gen research tools as part of the skills curriculum? If so, how? In this article, the authors respond with a resounding “Yes” and propose a set of teaching ideas for doing so without sacrificing precious class time. They conclude that Ravel and Casetext pose an intriguing and exciting possibility for achieving the pedagogical goals of legal skills classrooms. In Spring 2014, the authors implemented a teaching and assessment classroom pilot module in the legal writing classroom using Ravel and Casetext, and this article builds from the lessons of that pilot. The authors contend that integrating these legal research innovations in the law school classroom advances significant pedagogical goals: teaching law students information literacy (e.g., research strategy, context, and source evaluation); teaching metacognitive skills; preparing students for law practice; and exploring professionalism and ethics issues. This article provides an overview of the pedagogical goals of teaching legal research skills, describes the newest “next gen” tools Ravel and Casetext, and discusses how teaching these tools furthers the pedagogical goals. Finally, the article describes in detail the pilot module used in one of the authors’ first-year legal writing classroom and suggests many possibilities for the integration of the newest “next gen” research tools in the legal skills classroom.

What is Casetext?

From their website – https://casetext.com:

By leveraging contributions from an active community of law professors and attorneys, Casetext is able to provide the public with free access to legal research, linked to an online legal community designed to connect you with colleagues in your field.

Want to learn more? Take a video tour of the site, read about our tools for sharing and discovery, or learn about searching on Casetext.

What is Ravel?

From their website – https://www.ravellaw.com:

Ravel Law is a new legal search, analytics, and visualization platform. Ravel enables lawyers to find, contextualize, and interpret information that turns legal data into legal insights. Ravel’s array of powerful tools – which include data-driven, interactive visualizations and analytics – transforms how lawyers understand the law and prepare for litigation. In today’s global and increasingly digital world, Ravel empowers attorneys to benefit from this huge influx of information and find value in it.

In 2012, Ravel spun out of Stanford University’s Law School, Computer Science Department, and d.school, with the support of CodeX (Stanford’s Center for Legal Informatics).

We’re based in San Francisco, California.

Are any law schools out there teaching these or other new legal research tools?


Live Blogging from the LegalEdWeb Webinar

December 13, 2014

jeremiah

Jeremiah Ho of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Law (above) led a webinar entitled “Flipping of the Law Classroom: Infusing Active Learning Through Technology.”

Here are some of his key points:

  • Flipped learning is not as popular in law school as in the undergrad classroom.
  • It is predominately done through short video lectures

Challenges for law schools:

  • competes with Socratic nature of law courses differently
  • possible loss of investigative or pressing discussion
  • could be difficult to do for complex doctrine
  • relegates doctrinal instruction into a more static mode

The Problem Method (active learning) is more compatible with law school.

Bar prep course & legal writing courses work well with the flipped method

Why  merge Active Learning with the Flipped Classroom?

  • transfers issue-spotting from page to screen
  • appeals to visual & auditory learning styles
  • sensory experience of fact-play
  • adds variety to tradition law instructional media
  • comports with problem method
  • immediacy

Examples:

  • Create a slide presentation that is colorful and with visual examples.
  • Have students perform skits or create their own problems/hypos.

Variations of this theme:

  • single-issue simulations
  • as part of performance exams
  • self-assessment
  • transactional law hypos
  • combined with traditional flipped instruction

The following resources may be helpful:

For more information on this topic, contact Professor Ho at jho@umassd.edu.

Video of the webinar:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Make Up Classes

December 12, 2014

Though law school classes are rarely cancelled, what can a professor do to “make up the class” if a class is cancelled.

Rescheduling is usually not an option due room schedules and student schedules.

Ignoring it is not an option because the course content needs to be covered.

One software that professors can use is Adobe Presenter.  With this software, they can re-purpose their PowerPoint presentation for that class by adding narration.  The presentation can then be uploaded as a PDF to the course’s LMS.  Students with Adobe Reader can view and listen to the content.

Although professors may spend a lot time narrating their presentation, students may not spend the time to listen to it.

It would defeat the purpose to just review the content in class.

Instead, professors can create an online quiz where students are required to listen the PowerPoint presentation in order to answer the quiz questions correctly.

quiz

One of the professors at Albany Law School did just that.  She narrated a PowerPoint presentation for her NY Practice class, posted it to TWEN and then asked students to take a 5 question quiz.

scores

This professor can see by the graph above that most of the students answered the questions correctly. In other words, they listened to the presentation.

Anyone else have suggestions for making up cancelled classes?


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