Flipping Civ Pro

October 13, 2014

Flipping the Classroom is a popular topic. In fact, in the most recent Horizon Report, the flipped classroom was named one of the most important emerging trends in educational technology for higher education …”because of how it rearranges face-to-face instruction for professors and students, creating a more efficient and enriching use of class time.”

The flipped class in law school has been the subject of several posts on this blog:

This semester, one of the professors at Albany Law School has decided to “flip” his Federal Civil Procedure class.

Each week he uses the software VideoScribe to create a video.

The video file is uploaded to TWEN for the students to watch outside of the classroom.

twen videos

Students have to certify that they have watched the video in its entirety.

week7

The professor also has the ability to check to see who has and who has not watched each video.

clicking + gives the names of the students who have watched

A detailed view can be seen monthly for each student showing how they watched the video (time, pausing, etc.):

video1

video2

During class time, the professor can spend time elaborating on what was covered in the video, answering questions about the content and engaging the students rather than using the traditional “Socratic method.”

I asked the professor about how things were going so far:

I think it’s much more productive (giving the students the material ahead of time) and I can use the time to do more examples, rather than lecture.

Then the important question…”Are the videos enhancing student learning?”

 I’m going to do an analysis.  I think they are helpful, but my analysis is going to try to determine whether there is any connection between watching the videos and how students fared on the mid-term.  Stay tuned.

As the professor says…STAY TUNED.

Are there any law school professors experimenting with “flipping the classroom?” If so, how is it working out? Are students learning better?

Here are some recommended articles for those considering “flipping” the Law School classroom:

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Flipping the Learning Paradigm with Adobe Presenter

June 27, 2014

Date: Tuesday, July 22, 2014
Time: 9:00 AM PT/ 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Dr. Allen Partridge

A growing trend in Higher Education suggests – move the content delivery out of the classroom and bring the students back in. What this essentially means is, a large number of Higher Ed institutions are embracing Flipped Learning, which lets you make use of the precious class time better to encourage collaborative learning.

In this session you will learn, how with Adobe Presenter, you can achieve Flipped Learning. Now turn your teaching content into HD videos from your desktop and publish to popular video sharing sites. Repurpose existing PowerPoint presentations with out-of-the-box assets, add eye-catching quizzes, and deliver these courses to your students’ desktops and tablets. Enable video analytics to identify learners who need extra help. Track advanced learner performance metrics when you upload these courses on leading learning management systems.

Register here for this complimentary session >>

At Albany Law School, many professors have been narrating their PowerPoint presentations using Adobe Presenter and then posting them as pdfs (with audio) in the course’s TWEN site.  These recorded presentations are assigned as homework. In class, the professors now have more time for discussion and assessments.


Flipped Learning

March 14, 2014

flipped

Reposted from:   http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/03/12/fln-announces-formal-definition-and-four-pillars.aspx

To counter common misconceptions and offer educators a practical framework for Flipped Learning, the governing board and key leaders of the Flipped Learning Network (FLN) today announced a formal definition of the term. According to Aaron Sams, FLN board member and coauthor of Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day, “One of the biggest misconceptions is that the main component of Flipped Learning is the use of video … although video is a very important component of Flipped Learning, the most valuable benefit is the enhanced use of class time to get students engaged in higher-order thinking.”

The FLN definition of Flipped Learning is the following: “Flipped Learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter.”

Along with the definition, FLN announced its Four Pillars of F-L-I-P and a checklist of 11 supporting indicators for educators. Jon Bergmann, coauthor of Flip Your Classroom and secretary/treasurer of the FLN, said of the checklist, “Educators can use it as a frame of reference because it demonstrates what effective Flipped Learning looks like. It’s a baseline — or roadmap — containing the principles of Flipped Learning.” FLN’s Four Pillars are the following:

Flexible Environment

Educators can create flexible spaces in which students choose when and where they learn. Furthermore, educators who flip their classes are flexible in their expectations of student timelines for learning and in their assessments of student learning.

Learning Culture

The Flipped Learning model deliberately shifts instruction to a learner-centered approach where class time is dedicated to exploring topics in greater depth and creating rich learning opportunities. Students are actively involved in knowledge construction as they participate in and evaluate their learning in a manner that is personally meaningful.

Intentional Content

Educators continually think about how they can use the Flipped Learning model to help students develop conceptual understanding and procedural fluency. Educators use intentional content to maximize class time in order to adopt methods of student-centered, active learning strategies.

Professional Educator

Professional educators continually observe their students, providing them with feedback relevant in the moment and assessing their work. Professional educators are reflective in their practice, connect with each other to improve their instruction, accept constructive criticism and tolerate controlled chaos in their classrooms.

Bergmann concluded, “We created the definition and checklist to help administrators and teachers alike get a better handle on what Flipped Learning really means. According to a survey from Project Tomorrow (2013), administrators are just as interested in Flipped Learning as teachers. So we see administrators as playing a vital role in supporting teachers. Flipping a classroom doesn’t happen overnight. It requires buy-in, collaboration and commitment.”

For complete details about the Four Pillars of F-L-I-P and a checklist of the 11 supporting indicators, visit FLN’s Flipped Learning definition page.

Other posted related to Flipped Learning:

Are any law schools using the Flipped Learning Model?